Nov. 29th, 2010

inverarity: (Default)
So, Audible.com is having another one of their sales and there are a whole bunch of books available for $4.95. I've already grabbed a bunch, but I'm thinking I should add a few more classics. If you're familiar with my reviews, you know that I read mostly non-fiction, science fiction, and fantasy, but I've been trying to add some more literary and classical selections to my bookshelf, as well as catching up on a few of those books everyone is supposed to read in high school but I never did. (Grumbles at Moby Dick, Catcher in the Rye, and The Grapes of Wrath sitting on his TBR stack.)

So, below are some of the selections which are on sale that I've never actually read and might conceivably enjoy. For you good folks who have read one or more of the following, please tell me which ones you'd recommend most highly and why. (Or, conversely, which ones you'd suggest I skip...)

Pride and Prejudice (I've seen it on-screen enough that I know the story, but I've never actually read an Austen novel.)
Jane Eyre (Ditto on Bronte.)
Rebecca (Looks pretty similar to the above two, but it's the only one whose story I don't already know.)
Middlemarch (Actually, this looks kind of like "generic Victorian drama," but it's supposed to be a classic...)
David Copperfield (I do like Dickens, and I haven't read this one. It's awfully long, though.)
The Brothers Karamazov (I vaguely recall liking Crime and Punishment, but that was in high school, a long time ago.)
The Beautiful and the Damned (I haven't read The Great Gatsby either.)
War and Peace (61 hours, OMG.)
Candide and Zadig (Is this actually interesting, or is it just one of those things you can say to sound all educated and cultured? "Why yes, of course I have read Voltaire's Candide...")
The Code of the Woosters (I know some people just love Wodehouse, but I dunno, the wacky hijinks of a rich prick and his smug servant?)
The Fountainhead (HAHAHA. Just kidding. I'd sooner listen to 32 hours of white noise.)
inverarity: (Default)
So, Audible.com is having another one of their sales and there are a whole bunch of books available for $4.95. I've already grabbed a bunch, but I'm thinking I should add a few more classics. If you're familiar with my reviews, you know that I read mostly non-fiction, science fiction, and fantasy, but I've been trying to add some more literary and classical selections to my bookshelf, as well as catching up on a few of those books everyone is supposed to read in high school but I never did. (Grumbles at Moby Dick, Catcher in the Rye, and The Grapes of Wrath sitting on his TBR stack.)

So, below are some of the selections which are on sale that I've never actually read and might conceivably enjoy. For you good folks who have read one or more of the following, please tell me which ones you'd recommend most highly and why. (Or, conversely, which ones you'd suggest I skip...)

Pride and Prejudice (I've seen it on-screen enough that I know the story, but I've never actually read an Austen novel.)
Jane Eyre (Ditto on Bronte.)
Rebecca (Looks pretty similar to the above two, but it's the only one whose story I don't already know.)
Middlemarch (Actually, this looks kind of like "generic Victorian drama," but it's supposed to be a classic...)
David Copperfield (I do like Dickens, and I haven't read this one. It's awfully long, though.)
The Brothers Karamazov (I vaguely recall liking Crime and Punishment, but that was in high school, a long time ago.)
The Beautiful and the Damned (I haven't read The Great Gatsby either.)
War and Peace (61 hours, OMG.)
Candide and Zadig (Is this actually interesting, or is it just one of those things you can say to sound all educated and cultured? "Why yes, of course I have read Voltaire's Candide...")
The Code of the Woosters (I know some people just love Wodehouse, but I dunno, the wacky hijinks of a rich prick and his smug servant?)
The Fountainhead (HAHAHA. Just kidding. I'd sooner listen to 32 hours of white noise.)
inverarity: (Default)
One-line summary: A Massive Swelling: Celebrity Re-Examined as a Grotesque Crippling Disease is a hilarious flaming jeremiad against the culture of fame, but so last decade.



Reviews:

Goodreads: Average: 3.85. Mode: 4 stars.
Amazon: Average: 4.2. Mode: 5 stars.


Whether you lust after it, loathe it, or feign apathy toward it, fame is in your face. Cintra Wilson gets to the heart of our humiliating fascination with celebrity and all its preposterous trappings in these hilarious, whip-smart, and subversive essays. Often radical and always a scream, Wilson takes on every sacred cow, toppling icons as diverse as Barbra Streisand, Ike Turner, Michael Jackson, and-for obvious reasons-Bruce Willis. She exposes events like the Oscars and even athletic jamborees as having grown a "tumescent aura of Otherness." Wilson's scathing and irresistible dissections of Las Vegas as "the Death Star of Entertainment," and Los Angeles as "a giant peach of a dream crawling with centipedes" pulse with her enlightened rejection of all things false and vain and egotistical. Written with her trademark zeal and intelligence, A Massive Swelling is the antidote for the fame virus that infects us all.


Read it now while most of the people she mocks are still alive )

Verdict: If you see this in the dollar bin, it's worth picking up. Someday all the names in this book will be trivia questions, but the savage snark is timeless.
inverarity: (Default)
One-line summary: A Massive Swelling: Celebrity Re-Examined as a Grotesque Crippling Disease is a hilarious flaming jeremiad against the culture of fame, but so last decade.



Reviews:

Goodreads: Average: 3.85. Mode: 4 stars.
Amazon: Average: 4.2. Mode: 5 stars.


Whether you lust after it, loathe it, or feign apathy toward it, fame is in your face. Cintra Wilson gets to the heart of our humiliating fascination with celebrity and all its preposterous trappings in these hilarious, whip-smart, and subversive essays. Often radical and always a scream, Wilson takes on every sacred cow, toppling icons as diverse as Barbra Streisand, Ike Turner, Michael Jackson, and-for obvious reasons-Bruce Willis. She exposes events like the Oscars and even athletic jamborees as having grown a "tumescent aura of Otherness." Wilson's scathing and irresistible dissections of Las Vegas as "the Death Star of Entertainment," and Los Angeles as "a giant peach of a dream crawling with centipedes" pulse with her enlightened rejection of all things false and vain and egotistical. Written with her trademark zeal and intelligence, A Massive Swelling is the antidote for the fame virus that infects us all.


Read it now while most of the people she mocks are still alive )

Verdict: If you see this in the dollar bin, it's worth picking up. Someday all the names in this book will be trivia questions, but the savage snark is timeless.

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